Fisker’s product pipeline includes much more than the ocean

Fisker’s product pipeline includes much more than the ocean

  • The Pear is an affordable crossover, smaller than the Ocean, and riding on its own platform. The price is expected to reach $29,999 when it launches in late 2025.
  • Fisker’s Alaska pickup truck will ride on a platform very similar to that of the Ocean SUV. The automaker calls the Alaskan “the world’s lightest and most sustainable electric pickup truck.”
  • There’s also a Ronin four-door GT convertible sports car that was shown off at a special Fisker product day in California recently.

Fisker has big plans for the future. The Ocean SUV, now available in the U.S., isn’t the only model in Fisker’s future. After I returned my Ocean loaner to the company’s tech center, I was told that there were, for this week only, both a Pear and an Alaska at the Fisker showroom at The Grove in trendy downtown Los Angeles.

So I went diving into the worst of Los Angeles traffic to see these two futuristic Fiskers.
The Pear is an affordable crossover, smaller than the Ocean, and riding on its own platform. The price is expected to reach $29,999 when it launches in late 2025.

Fisker pears 2026 with its doors open

The posterior opening of the pear slides downward underground.

Fisker

That’s quite affordable, especially if it could qualify for federal tax credits if the Pear were built at the Lordstown, Ohio, plant, now owned by Foxconn. Negotiations are still ongoing, and the current federal tax credit is $7,500 (a number that will change by 2025).

Pear is full of clever innovations. For example, the rear hatch retracts into the ground instead of swinging up or out like most SUVs. Instead of a cabinet on the front, it has a slide-out drawer that can be heated convectionally if you’re in the catering business.

It has the same SolarRoof as the Ocean and offers a lounge mode where the four seats lie flat — or near flat — for camping, or whatever else you can do in such a space.

An optional front bench raises passenger accommodations from five in all other competitors to six in the Pear. The Pear will also be a software-defined vehicle, they say, with a central computer handling everything rather than several different computers throughout the vehicle.

Fisker calls the Ronin “the world’s first four-door GT sports convertible.”

How can they do all that for less than 30k?

“We designed it so it will use 35% fewer parts than the competitor,” a Fisker employee said in the showroom. “So think about what that means in terms of logistics, in terms of supply chain, in terms of cost. That’s one of the ways we’re attacking — making this vehicle really affordable for everyone — through that kind of design thinking.”

2026 Fisker Alaska parked on the road

The Fisker Alaska pickup truck has an innovative and versatile bed that ranges in length from 4.5 feet to 7.2 feet to 9.2 feet.

Fisker

Next, across the showroom was a prototype of a Fisker Alaska pickup truck. It will ride on a platform very similar to that of the Ocean SUV. Fisker says the Alaska will be “the lightest and most sustainable electric pickup truck in the world.”

It will have its share of innovation as well. The cab divider, essentially the back wall of the cab, will fold flat with the rear seats to increase bed size from 4.5 feet to 7.2 feet. Then when you fold the tailgate, the bed length reaches 9.2 feet. The price will supposedly be $45,900 when it is also released at the end of 2025.

Silver Fisker Ronin sports car

The Fisker Ronin supercar has rather strange dimensions.

Fisker

And in case all that wasn’t enough, there’s a supercar called the Ronin that was shown off at a special Fisker Product Day in California recently. The Ronin is what Fisker calls “…the world’s first four-door GT sports convertible.” It is also scheduled to debut in late 2025.

Henrik Fisker seems like a perfectly reasonable man. He has none of the megalomania of Elon Musk, or the hard-working engineering mind of Peter Rawlinson. He’s a designer who’s probably tired of entry-level executives with $11 MBAs changing his designs.

So he created his own company, or companies, since he decided what, three or four? Let him go to town. If these things worked, we’d have a lot more cool cars, right? In addition, it is possible that he really wants to change the world through environmental awareness and good design.

With the market for battery electric vehicles shrinking, is there room for a small startup like Fisker? Please comment below.

Photo of Mark Vaughn's head

Mark Vaughn grew up in a Ford family and spent many hours holding a trouble light over a straight-six car miraculously fed by a single-cylinder carburetor while his father cursed Ford, all of its products, and everyone who ever worked there. This was the introduction to objective criticism of automobiles. He started writing for the City News Service in Los Angeles, then moved to Europe and became editor of an automobile magazine called, creatively, Auto. He decided that Auto should cover Formula 1, sports models and touring cars, and no one stopped him! From there he gave an interview to Autoweek at the 1989 Frankfurt Motor Show and has been with us ever since.

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